News Release
 
THOMPSON LEADS COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

For the past seven years, Felecia Thompson applied her gifts to meet the needs of Trinity students. Now she is meeting the needs of the entire Trinity community.

Thompson began the 2004-05 academic year as the College's executive associate to the president for community partnerships, a new position that will facilitate Trinity's move toward a greater presence in the metropolitan Chicago area.

"This is an opportunity for me to help put us on the map as an institution that provides an exceptional Christian liberal arts higher education," she said. "We also want to demonstrate that we are concerned about Chicago and the surrounding region. My task is to help our students become educated outside their normal Christian setting by utilizing the resources that Chicago has to offer."

The former director of academic support and services - a position she has held since 1997 - feels well-equipped to shoulder the load of being Trinity's public liaison. As a former executive director of a social service agency in Chicago, she knows the significance of networking and building bridges.

"Trinity's strategic plan shows how important partnerships are to our mission," Thompson said. "I will need to sustain and strengthen some existing relationships while also looking to establish new partners that have local, regional, and national ties. Each of those responsibilities is equally important."

President Steven Timmermans acknowledged that Trinity has a great track record of community collaboration and believes Thompson can lead the College to accomplish greater things.

"We have needed a person to make high-quality connections between our campus and the community," Timmermans said. "Felecia possesses a vibrant Christian faith, a crucial understanding of servanthood and education, and extensive cross-cultural skills - all of which are important for the success of this position."

Thompson concluded that one way to forge partnerships is to bring more guests and prospective partners on campus.

"People need to see what we look like," she said. "We have a lot to offer; we have to get the word out and people in. Whether we host concerts, educational conferences, recreational events, professional development workshops, or social awareness seminars, we have to attract people in our community to Trinity with things that will benefit them and they will enjoy without compromising our identity. I believe we can do it."


back to news & events